Category: Media & Entertainment


2014 World Cup

Millions of people across the United States will be glued to their televisions, laptops and mobile devices over the next month to keep up with the 2014 World Cup. But how social of an experience will it be?

Influenster, a community of social media tastemakers, polled over a thousand American men and women, 18-45 years old, to find out what else these f tbol fans would be doing while watching the games. One-third will download an app (the most popular are the FIFA official app, ESPN FC and Yahoo Sports) to follow along, while 86 percent of Twitter members will live-tweet while watching.

But who is everyone rooting for? 71 percent will cheer for Team USA, followed by Mexico, Brazil and Spain. But those Team USA fans are realistic – only one-third see the US taking home the trophy – and dedicated: 75 percent will continue to watch the games even if Team USA does not progress, and those fans favor Brazil for the win.

Click here to see Influenster’s infographics, and see all the poll results here.

World Cup Poll

Archival Disc

Sony and Panasonic have named the next-generation storage discs that will be the successor to Blu-Ray. They revealed it will be called the Archival Disc. It will eventually hold 1TB of data, the equivalent of 250 DVD films. 300GB versions of the discs will be launched in 2015. They will be aimed at big companies that need to store vast amounts of data. The firms signed an agreement to work on the next-generation storage medium last summer. The first iteration will be a double-sided disc with three layers of data per side with 300GB capacity, it revealed. Current dual-layer Blu-ray discs can store up to 50GB of data. Over time the firms will roll out 500GB and 1TB versions of the disk, a joint statement from the firms said.

Read the full story at The BBC.

Intel

Intel is asking about $500 million for OnCue, the online pay-TV service that the world’s largest chipmaker developed before dialing back its ambitions, according to people with knowledge of the process. Intel is seeking to secure a sale by year-end, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the talks are private. One suitor, Verizon, has begun talking with owners of broadcast and cable channels about terms for a streaming TV service, the people said. A sale that meets Intel’s asking price would let the company recoup its costs as it retreats on a plan to enter the pay-TV business, while still supplying chips to the new owner. Samsung and Liberty Global also met with Intel, people said earlier. Intel’s TV efforts slowed under Chief Executive Officer Brian M. Krzanich, who took the reins in May and has focused on getting chips into mobile devices.

Read the full story at Bloomberg.

Aereo

In another victory for Aereo, the controversial TV-over-the-Web startup, a federal appeals court on Tuesday refused to rehear an earlier decision allowing the service to continue in the New York City area. Aereo, which is backed by IAC Chairman Barry Diller, uses antenna/DVR technology to let consumers watch live, local over-the-air television broadcasts on some Internet-connected devices, including the iPad and iPhone. That capability provoked a lawsuit from TV broadcast giants including NBC, ABC, and CBS (the parent of CNET), which allege that the service violates their copyrights and that Aereo must pay them retransmission fees. Today’s decision lets stand a ruling in April in which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit denied a preliminary injunction (PDF) from the TV networks preventing Aereo from transmitting recorded broadcast television programs to subscribers.

Read the full story at CNET.

What’s going to happen to Hulu? Since founding chief executive officer, Jason Kilar, and chief technology officer, Tom Rich, announced in early January their plans to step down in the first quarter of this year, neither Hulu’s current leadership nor its owners (Comcast, News Corp and Disney) have discussed publicly their plans for the video-streaming service. According to a report published by The Wall Street Journal on Friday, News Corp and Disney have begun discussing possible next steps for Hulu and their own stakes in the company. The Journal reported that both companies – which each own between a quarter and a third of the video service – have suggested purchasing the other’s stake, or selling to an outsider. The two disagree on the direction Hulu should go.

Read the full story at Mashable.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 108 other followers

%d bloggers like this: