Category: The Wall Street Journal


The National Security Agency ended a program used to spy on German Chancellor Angela Merkel and a number of other world leaders after an internal Obama administration review started this summer revealed to the White House the existence of the operations, U.S. officials said.

Officials said the internal review turned up NSA monitoring of some 35 world leaders, in the U.S. government’s first public acknowledgment that the U.S. government tapped the phones of world leaders.

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Long before I started work as the CEO of Apple, I became aware of a fundamental truth: People are much more willing to give of themselves when they feel that their selves are being fully recognized and embraced.

At Apple, we try to make sure people understand that they don’t have to check their identity at the door. We’re committed to creating a safe and welcoming workplace for all employees, regardless of their race, gender, nationality or sexual orientation.

As we see it, embracing people’s individuality is a matter of basic human dignity and civil rights. It also turns out to be great for the creativity that drives our business. We’ve found that when people feel valued for who they are, they have the comfort and confidence to do the best work of their lives.

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In a deal that would be one of the biggest-ever foreign takeovers of a Japanese firm, Applied Materials Inc. agreed to acquire Tokyo Electron Ltd. to create to create a powerhouse provider of chip manufacturing equipment.

The all-stock deal announced by the two companies on Tuesday is effectively a takeover by Applied and values Tokyo Electron at $9.3 billion, a modest premium to its market value of 872.3 billion ($8.8 billion). Shareholders of Applied, valued at $19.7 billion under the deal, will own 68 percent of the new company. Both the CEO and CFO of the new company will come from Applied.

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Joshua Edwards’s eighth-grade paper about the Black Plague came with a McDouble and fries.

Joshua sometimes does his homework at a McDonald’s restaurant — not because he is drawn by the burgers, but because the fast-food chain is one of the few places in his small town where he can get online access free once the public library closes.

Cheap smartphones and tablets have put Web-ready technology into more hands than ever. But the price of Internet connectivity hasn’t come down nearly as quickly.

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