Tag Archive: cameras


Capturing Couture Symphony Neck Shoulder Strap For Canon, Nikon, Samsung, Olympus, Sony, Fujifilm, Panasonic, DSLR Cameras and a Spot Cleaning Cloth With Storage Pouch

  • Floral pattern, lined with black velvet trim, customized metal logos, adjustable straps for around-the-neck or messenger-style wear
  • Nylon webbing
  • Each end adjusts up to 14 for maximum strap length of 58
  • Spot clean with cloth and water
  • 1-year Limited Manufacturer’s Warranty

Carrying your camera has never looked so cool.
The Symphony strap has a floral pattern and black velvet trim lining offer an always-fashionable vintage look and feel. Adjustable straps allow you to wear the camera around your neck or across your body, messenger style. From Capturing Couture.

Free Cleaning Cloth With Storage Pouch
Laundering the cloth will remove collected dust and oils restoring it to like new condition. You can attach the pouch to the strap, gadget bag, etc. usin

Underwater Waterproof Housing Case for Canon PowerShot SX200IS Digital Camera

  • Waterproof underwater housing usable up to 16.4 (5.0 m)
  • Meets standard requirements for JIS (Japan Industrial Standards) IPX8 at 0.5 water pressure (underwater 5.0m), tested for 30 minutes
  • Can be used for a high-end digital camera with a zoom lens function
  • Included extension ring for cameras with longer zoom lenses
  • Protects a camera from water, sand, dust, etc. in the ocean and mountains

All controls are accessible – The DiCAPac WP610 Waterproof Underwater Case (Clear/Dark Brown) is a PVC vinyl housing with a polycarbonate lens made to allow a high-end digital camera to operate underwater to 16.4 (5.0 m). It can be used with a camera that has a zoom lens. It protects the camera from water, sand, dust, etc. in the ocean and mountains. The housing meets JIS IPX8 requirements for underwater usage. This case has a UP ring extension. A neck strap is included.

Underwater Waterproof Housing Case for Canon PowerShot SX200IS Digital Camera

  • Waterproof underwater housing usable up to 16.4 (5.0 m)
  • Meets standard requirements for JIS (Japan Industrial Standards) IPX8 at 0.5 water pressure (underwater 5.0m), tested for 30 minutes
  • Can be used for a high-end digital camera with a zoom lens function
  • Included extension ring for cameras with longer zoom lenses
  • Protects a camera from water, sand, dust, etc. in the ocean and mountains

All controls are accessible – The DiCAPac WP610 Waterproof Underwater Case (Clear/Dark Brown) is a PVC vinyl housing with a polycarbonate lens made to allow a high-end digital camera to operate underwater to 16.4 (5.0 m). It can be used with a camera that has a zoom lens. It protects the camera from water, sand, dust, etc. in the ocean and mountains. The housing meets JIS IPX8 requirements for underwater usage. This case has a UP ring extension. A neck strap is included.

Olympus Nylon PEN, OM-D & E-Series DSLR Camera Case for E-5, E-3, E-30, EVOLT E-600, E-620, PEN E-PL1, E-PL2, E-P3, E-PL3, E-PM1 & OM-D E-M5 Digital Cameras

  • Accommodates Olympus DSLR, PEN & OM-D Digital Cameras, plus up to 2-3 lenses and accessories
  • Padded Ballistic Nylon
  • Two adjustable velcro dividers
  • Large, zippered front pocket
  • Interior Dimensions (WxHxD): 8 x 5 x 5 in.

Every photographer needs portable storage for their gear, and if you’re looking to keep your Olympus cameras and lenses well-protected when you’re on the go, then the Olympus gadget bag is the perfect fit! This bag features a padded interior capable of fitting nearly any camera body with up to two standard-size lenses or flashes. Two adjustable velcro dividers keep your gear free from scratches. A large, zippered front pocket provides room for small accessories. This bag comes with a padded ad

Tamron AF 28-75mm f/2.8 SP XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) for Canon Digital SLR Cameras (Model A09E)

  • 28-75mm autofocus zoom lens with f/2.8 maximum aperture
  • Designed to meet performance characteristics of digital SLR cameras
  • Minimum focusing distance of 13 inches; rotation-type zoom
  • Smaller and lighter than most fast zoom lenses; weighs 18 ounces
  • Measures 2.9 inches in diameter and 3.6 inches long; 6-year warranty

28-75mm autofocus zoom lens with f/2.8 maximum apertureDesigned to meet performance characteristics of digital SLR camerasMinimum focusing distance of 13 inches; rotation-type zoomSmaller and lighter than most fast zoom lenses; weighs 18 ouncesMeasures 2.9 inches in diameter and 3.6 inches long; 6-year warranty

Jason D. Little – Light Stalking

Given the ubiquity of the camera phone and their ever increasing quality, there are people who are perfectly content having their mobile device also serve as their only camera. I, for one, would likely experience something akin to severe withdrawal if I had to give up my dSLR and shoot exclusively with my cellphone.

But, as with everything in life, I am willing to bet that such a circumstance would present you with at least a few important points that you will want to retain. So no matter where you are on your journey as a photographer, consider the following lessons you can learn from shooting with a camera phone.

For most of us, we would rather offer up an internal organ (a kidney maybe, or even better, the actually useful but still totally expendable appendix) than part with our cameras. I guess it makes sense to feel that way, considering we sometimes see our technology-laden cameras as being more important than they are, assigning to them a value directly proportional to the photos we make.

7 Lessons You Can Learn from Shooting with a Camera Phone

But we’re all familiar with the notion that great photographers make great photos regardless of what camera they have in hand. I’m not suggesting that everyone should run around with pinhole cameras just to prove that they are “good” photographers, but it would probably be a fun and worthwhile exercise to undertake. And if you were indeed to put aside your trusty dSLR, your next best alternative wouldn’t be so low-tech as a pinhole camera; you’d likely turn to your mobile phone camera.

1. Seeing

Shooting with your phone’s camera is going to free up your head. Obviously, you’re not going to have any gear to lug around and, perhaps most important, you don’t really have any settings to fiddle with. You’re free to spend much more of your time simply seeing; you’ll eventually find yourself looking at everything and everybody in a different way than if you were using a dSLR. Since you have so little control over settings, you won’t be able to fall back on any technical contrivances. You will have to learn to rely solely on your ability to “see” good things in order to make good photos.

2. Using Your Feet

Have you ever used your phone’s zoom feature? If you have, then you know the results are appalling. It’s a conundrum of engineering: the thinner phones get, the more difficult it is to design a built-in camera with a usable zoom. Zooming in on most phones means it’s using digital zoom, just blowing up and cropping in on an image, causing it to appear pixellated and rather ugly. So, forget the zoom. If you want the subject closer to your lens, your best bet is to use your feet. This idea translates well to the dSLR user also, especially when using a prime lens. Sometimes (but not always) it’s better to get closer to your subject.

3. Finding the Light

While the sensors found in camera phones improve with each generation of devices, they are still no match for the sensors found in dSLRs and, as such, are prone to struggle when it comes to capturing adequate light. To compensate, you will need to learn to find good lighting, whether natural (wait a moment for that cloud to pass) or artificial (turn on the lights in the room). Applying the same principle to shooting with your dSLR will allow you can keep ISO levels low.

4. Composing Your Shot

Repeat after me: “composition still matters when you’re using a camera phone.” You may have little to no control over shutter speed or ISO on your phone, but you do have total control over composition. There’s no reason to disregard it just because you’re shooting with a camera phone; in fact, the camera display on your phone is probably equipped with an optional grid overlay singularly purposed to help you compose your shot according to the classic “rule of thirds.” Use it. Strengthening your compositional skills is never a bad thing and it will give you the foundation you need to start breaking the rules of conventional composition.

5. Companionship

Having a cellphone that doubles as a camera is convenient (a gross understatement, I know). It’s lightweight, fits in a pocket, doesn’t require lens changes – it easily goes everywhere you go, making it possible for you to capture life as it happens. To invoke another old photography adage, the best camera is the one you have with you. Using your camera phone in this fashion just might encourage you to start taking your dSLR with you everywhere, allowing you to document the speed of life in higher quality.

6. Maintenance

Most people I’ve observed tend to dote over their devices, cleaning and charging them on a very regular basis, and carrying them in protective cases. It’s understandable behavior; after all, what good is a dead or broken phone? The lesson here for dSLR users is that you should maintain your camera with the same dedication. Public charging stations for cell phones are becoming easier to find in most cities; I don’t think such a thing exists for big camera batteries. Thus, it would be to your advantage to keep at least one fully charged spare battery with you whenever you’re out shooting, and when you return home, recharge each battery you used even if it’s only partially drained.

7. Appreciation

Despite the advancements being made in mobile phone cameras -better sensors, better lenses, more megapixels – it’s never going to be enough to sway dSLR users away from their cameras. But if you have ever spent a significant amount of time shooting exclusively with a camera phone, I can only imagine how eager you were to be reunited with your main camera. No, it doesn’t fit in your pocket and you can’t make calls or play games on it, but it’s your bread and butter. You’re an artist and it’s your paintbrush. Your camera phone makes a great sidekick, but it can never be the main attraction. Give your main camera the love and respect it deserves.

7 Lessons You Can Learn from Shooting with a Camera Phone

They say good technique is more important than anything else. Is it true? If you think you’re up to it, challenge yourself to shooting for a few days with just your camera phone and consider how what you learn along the way can apply to shooting with your DSLR. If you’re recently transitioning from a camera phone to a DSLR, have you found anything in particular that has been helpful in making the transition a little easier? Feel free to share.


This post by Jason D. Little is republished with permission from Light Stalking. Jason Little is a photographer (shooting macros, portraits, candids, and the occasional landscape), part time writer, and full time lover of music. You can see Jason’s photography on his photography blog or on Flickr.

Image credits: Flickr/Paul Bica, Flickr/Bram & Vera, Shuttershock/Evgenia Bolyukh

Samsung recently launched their new Galaxy Camera in the US and Europe and now Samsung has also launched the Galaxy Camera in their home market of South Korea.

The Samsung Galaxy Camera will be available in South Korea with 4G LTE support, and the device comes with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and features a 16 megapixel sensor.

Samsung Galaxy Camera

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